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Electrician Contractor in Lexington, SC

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We Keep Lexington Shining Bright

Electricity - it's one of the most important innovations in the history of humankind. It's hard to imagine life without electricity, and for good reason. Nearly every aspect of our lives is affected by electricity in some form or fashion, from the way you wash your clothes to the effort you put in at work. From a residential standpoint, you need it to cook, clean, entertain, and live comfortably. For commercial purposes, electricity is used to power the computers needed to keep America moving. That's why, when the electricity in your home or at your job is compromised, life grinds to a halt. Unfortunately, electrical problems are inevitable in today's day and age. When the electricity in your home or commercial workspace fails, you need a quick, effective solution that will get your life back on track. And that, in a nutshell, is where L&M Electric, Inc. shines the brightest.

Our company was founded in 2009 by Roger Lee and John Mezzles. With a combined 46 years of electrical experience, the two entrepreneurs set out to create a company that offers quality workmanship and unparalleled service to all its builders and clients. Today, we are proud to have served South Carolina for nearly two decades as the premier electrician contractor in Lexington, SC. Our family-owned business specializes in both residential and commercial electrical work. Our highly-trained team has the experience and skills to handle any electrical issue, from minor panel breaker problems to large-scale industrial issues.

Despite winning numerous awards and recognitions in the Southeast, we don't let our accolades go to our head. Our team is committed to providing effective, personalized electrical work for every one of our customers. We take pride in our ability to offer peace of mind to our customers when they need it most, and that's exactly what we aim to provide to you too. We're talking one-on-one service provided by a friendly, professional electrician. There are no corners cut, no hidden fees, and no excuses - only the highest quality work from the finest electricians in Lexington.

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$99 Electrical Home Safety Inspection

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What sets us apart from other electricians in Lexington, SC? It boils down to three reasons:
Customer-Centric, Quality Electric Service
Customer-Centric, Quality Electric Service

As guests in your home, you won't ever have to worry about a member of our team trying to sell you something you don't need. Our job is to serve your electrical needs. You expect the highest quality electrical work in South Carolina, and that's what we will provide.

Experienced, Affordable Electricians
Experienced, Affordable Electricians

You understand that the highest quality work requires fair compensation, but you're not made of money. Our commitment is to offer affordable electric work at a price you're satisfied paying.

Family Owned & Operated
Family Owned & Operated

We know that you are choosing L&M Electric for a reason. Unlike large corporations, we truly care about our customers. As a family business, serving you is personal for us. We stake our reputation on the quality of our work. As such, we are accountable and will always strive to deliver the service you have come to expect from our company.

Affordable Electric Service That Makes You Feel Like Family

At L&M Electric, we employ the brightest commercial and residential electricians in Lexington. Having electricians that specialize in both residential and commercial projects allow us to provide our customers with a wider range of services.

Our team fixes a broad range of electrical issues, but we have built our reputation on the following electric services:

 Smart Home Electrician Lexington, SC

Electrical Repairs

Every homeowner has to deal with an electrical component breaking or failing at some point. When that happens, you need a partner who can troubleshoot the problem and correct the issue efficiently and effectively. A few common problems that we help solve for our customers include:

  • Ceiling Fan Repair
  • Light Fixture Repair
  • Light Switch & Outlet Repair
  • Electrical Safety Inspection
 Smart Home Installation Lexington, SC

Electrical Installations

Whether you have a new ceiling fan that needs to be installed or you have a new electrical outlet that you'd like added to your bedroom, L&M Electric is here to help. Our team installs quality solutions every day of the week - there's no electrical installation job your residential electrician in Lexington, SC, can't handle. Here is a glance at some of the installation projects that we complete for homeowners:

  • Smart Home Installation
  • Electric Car Charging Station Installation
  • Whole-Home Surge Protection Installation
 Electrical Repairs Lexington, SC

Renovations and Remodeling

If you're renovating or remodeling your home, you need a professional electrician on-hand to work to properly install your new electrical devices and systems. Our skilled electricians are happy to work with you or your remodeling consultant to install your lights and keep your home shining bright. Common renovation and remodeling jobs include:

  • Hot Tub Wiring
  • Kitchen Lighting Renovations
  • Finished Basement Electrical Wiring
 Electrical Safety Inspection Company Lexington, SC

New Construction Electrical Projects

Many new construction homeowners stress about having their electrical system wired from scratch. For us, it's just another day on the job. If you're building your dream home, don't leave your electrical work to mediocre electricians. Trust L&M electric for reliable service and the highest quality electrical work in Lexington. A few new construction projects we handle are:

  • Breaker Panel Box Installation
  • Wiring for Backup Generator
  • Landscape Lighting Outdoors
  • Low Voltage Wiring
 Whole Home Electrical Install Lexington, SC

Your Residential Electrician in Lexington, SC

When you own a home, there's something inherently fulfilling about taking care of your property and fixing issues that pop up over time. When it comes to electrical work, however, DIY projects can be dangerous. Electricity is an amazing innovation, but if you aren't fully trained and licensed to handle such work, it's best to leave it to the experts at L&M Electric. Your home's safety is essential for you and your family. Our team will go above and beyond to ensure that your home's electrical system is operating correctly without any concerning problems.

With more than 60 years of combined experience as electricians, we are capable of troubleshooting and fixing a litany of electrical issues in your house. Keep reading to learn more about the most common electrical issues our customers report, along with some handy tips on how to remediate such problems.

Electrical Services Lexington, SC

Panel Breaker is Tripped

If you don't have any power in your home, it might be time to check your electrical panel to see if there are any tripped breakers. If you spot a tripped breaker, try your best to switch it over to its original position. If you can't, remember that some breakers need to be flipped to the "off" position before turning it back on. If you don't have any luck, give our office a call. We'll send a trained residential electrician in Lexington to your home to fix the problem on-site.

 Remodel And Renovation Electrical Work Lexington, SC

Overhead Fan Stops Working

If you have an overhead fan in your living room or bedroom, you know how quickly it can accumulate dust. Most homeowners clean up using a rod duster. However, sometimes homeowners accidentally hit the fan direction switch when doing so. But, instead of flipping it "on" or "off," they bump it into a limbo zone where neither direction is selected. When this happens, your overhead fan will not spin. If one of your fans stops working suddenly, this is one of the most common reasons why. If you're sure you didn't hit the fan direction switch, it could be an indication of a larger problem. In this case, call our office for a free phone consultation. We'll troubleshoot with you over the phone and if necessary, send out an electrician.

 Electrician Lexington, SC

Kitchen Breaker Keeps Tripping

If your home was built in the last 35 years, chances are it has two 20-amp circuits running to your kitchen countertop outlets. Newer homes will have three circuits. If you're constantly tripping the breaker to your kitchen, it's most likely because you have too many electrical devices connected to the same circuit. To help alleviate this problem, place appliances like coffee makers and toasters on two different circuits. That way, they can share the load.

At the end of the day, your home is your place of solitude and relaxation. But, when you have electrical issues in your home, things can quickly go from peaceful to problematic. Whether you're renovating your home and need a new room wired for power or your panel breaker keeps giving your problems, L&M Electric is here to assist. If you have questions about an issue or need to schedule service, our team is ready to help answer your questions and coordinate the best time for a residential electrician to come to your home in Lexington.

 Smart Home Electrician Lexington, SC

Tips to Save Money and Maintain Your Home's Electrical Systems

Unlike some of our competitors, who are reluctant to provide any information that might prevent them from making a buck, L&M Electric is all about empowering our customers. If we can offer sound advice that will educate our clients and help them save money, we have no problem doing so. That's why we have put together some helpful tips and tricks for maintaining your home's most common electrical systems. Because, at the end of the day, a little knowledge can go a long way when it comes to your family's safety.

 Smart Home Installation Lexington, SC

Install Surge Protectors

Intense lighting storms can cause powerful surges of electricity that ruin your home's electrical appliances and amenities. Surge protectors installed at your electrical panel can help prevent these surges by grounding the electricity running through your home. They do so by directing it away from your electrical devices. This common solution is inexpensive, effective, and always a better choice than replacing expensive items like TVs and computers.

 Electrical Repairs Lexington, SC

Examine Your Breaker Panel

Breaker panels control the power to your home. When they go bad or are damaged, there's a good chance that you will lose power to most of the rooms in your house. Open your breaker panel and keep a sharp eye out for signs of corrosion and rust. Double-check that each breaker you see flips on and off properly. If you notice corrosion or if the breaker switches won't flip, it's time to get in touch with a residential electrician in Lexington, SC, who can inspect your breaker panel and recommend upgrades if necessary.

 Electrical Safety Inspection Company Lexington, SC

Test Your GFIs

GFIs, or Ground Fault Interrupters, are similar to surge protectors in that they prevent electrical damage from happening in your home. The primary job of a GFI is to prevent electrical shocks that happen during a ground fault. Because water is a conductor of electricity, GFIs should be installed anywhere that an outlet comes into contact with water. You should try to test your GFIs every month, if possible, to ensure that they are working correctly. When you look closely at your GFI, you will notice a "test" and a "reset" button. Hit the "test" button to trip the GFI outlet and then hit "reset" to restore power. If your outlet resets, your GFI is working as it should. If not, you need to replace your GFI outlet. Because electricity is involved, we recommend hiring a professional to install new GFIs in your home. That way, you know the job is done right.

 Whole Home Electrical Install Lexington, SC

Replace Outdated Light Bulbs

The right light bulb can add the perfect amount of ambiance to your home. Eventually, however, even the best light bulbs will need replacing. While they don't need checking every month, it's a good idea to inspect all your bulbs at the beginning of the year. If any of your bulbs are dead, you should replace them. You should also consider replacing bulbs that are incandescent with LED lights. LED light bulbs may cost more upfront but use less electricity and are more efficient over the long run.

Electrical Services Lexington, SC

Schedule a Home Safety Inspection

In terms of preventative maintenance, scheduling a safety inspection for your home's electrical systems should be a high priority. These inspections will shine a light on the electrical features in your home that need to be fixed. Most modern electrical fires are caused by short circuit arcs, defective insulation, or broken wiring. An inspection conducted by a qualified electrician will help determine what needs to be fixed so you and your family stay safe in your home. Your inspector should cover your whole home and will examine common features such as:

  • Breakers
  • Fans
  • Exposed Wiring
  • Electrical Panels
  • Circuits
  • Switches
  • Outlets and More
 Remodel And Renovation Electrical Work Lexington, SC

DELIVERING QUALITY ELECTRICAL SERVICE TO 5,000+ HOMES PER YEAR

he electrical system in your home brings it to life from the lights and appliances we use every day to the entertainment we all love and enjoy. You want an electrician that makes you feel safe while delivering the quality services you're promised.

ELECTRICIAN SERVICE REQUEST

Full-Service Electrical Work for Home and Business

Whether you need light switch services for your newly renovated home or need a generator installed at your commercial property, L&M Electric is here to serve you. Our team will get the job done right, so you can get back to loving your life in the Lowcountry.

Coantact Us
 Electrician Lexington, SC

Latest News in Lexington, SC

Two ‘A’ grades on safety for Midlands hospitals, but another is lowest rated in SC

Two Midlands hospitals received the highest mark possible in the safety grades released by a medical watchdog group Wednesday. But a large number of area hospitals saw their ratings drop since the last scores were released in the spring.Lexington Medical Center was given an A grade, and was ranked among the ...

Two Midlands hospitals received the highest mark possible in the safety grades released by a medical watchdog group Wednesday. But a large number of area hospitals saw their ratings drop since the last scores were released in the spring.

Lexington Medical Center was given an A grade, and was ranked among the safest hospitals in South Carolina, according to the Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade.

“I applaud Lexington Medical Center’s leadership and workforce for their strong commitment to safety and transparency,” Leapfrog Group President and CEO Leah Binder said in a news release. “An ‘A’ Safety Grade is a sign that hospitals are continuously evaluating their performance, so that they can best protect patients.”

The A was an improvement for Lexington Medical Center. Lexington received a B in the spring, as well as the same score in the 2021 fall and spring ratings.

“Lexington Medical Center is constantly striving to provide the best possible outcomes for our patients,” Lexington Medical Center President and CEO Tod Augsburger said in the release. “Hospital safety is a top priority and I’m glad that our doctors, nurses and staff can be recognized for their efforts as we work to meet the health care needs of our communities.”

Since 2012, the Leapfrog Group has published Hospital Safety Scores twice a year — once in the spring and once during the fall — to create transparency in the U.S. health system. The rating is focused on “errors, accidents, injuries and infections.”

Based on this criteria, other Columbia-Lexington-area hospitals received four Bs and one C for the fall. Those include:

? Prisma Health Baptist Parkridge’s grade dropped one letter from A in the spring ranking to B, marking the first time since the 2019 grades the hospital wasn’t given an A

? Prisma Health Baptist’s grade dropped one letter from A in the spring ranking to B

? MUHA Columbia Medical Center Downtown’s grade rose one letter from C in the spring ranking to B. The hospital was formerly Providence Health.

? MUSC Health Columbia Medical Center Northeast’s grade rose one letter from C in the spring ranking to B. The facility was formerly Providence Health Northeast.

? Prisma Health Richland repeated its score from the spring ranking of C

One other hospital in the Midlands received an A, while one that had a D in the spring remains the lowest rated hospital in South Carolina in the current ranking.

? McCleod Health Clarendon in Manning repeated its score from the spring ranking of A, a grade it has received since 2020

? Prisma Health Tuomey’s grade dropped one letter from A in the spring ranking to B

? Newberry County Memorial Hospital’s grade dropped one letter from B in the spring ranking to C

? MUSC Health Kershaw Medical Center’s grade dropped one letter from B in the spring ranking to C

? Regional Medical Center of Orangeburg and Calhoun Counties repeated its score from the spring ranking of D

Overall in South Carolina, of the 51 hospitals that were ranked, 15 received a letter A. That’s a drop from 21 in the spring rankings.

No hospitals in the Palmetto State received an F in the fall grades. The D given to the Regional Medical Center of Orangeburg and Calhoun Counties was the lowest mark dispensed, and it was the only hospital scored that low.

Nationally, South Carolina ranked 21st among all states, with more than 29% of its hospitals scoring an A rating. That was a significant decrease from the spring (41%), when the Palmetto State was ranked 13th in the nation.

New Hampshire (53.8%) saw a meteoric rise to become the top-rated state in the U.S. after placing in the middle of the pack at 25th in the spring grades. There was a three-way tie for lowest grade among North Dakota, Vermont, and Washington, D.C., as none had a hospital with an A grade.

“Upwards of 250,000 people die every year from preventable errors in hospitals,” the Leapfrog Group said. “It’s up to everyone to make sure that patient safety is the number one priority at every hospital across the United States.”

Leapfrog graded about 3,000 hospitals nationwide this fall, and 30% earned an A, 28% earned a B, 36% a C, 6% a D and 1% scored an F, according to its website.

The grades are based on safety data and rate how hospitals have “checks in place to prevent mistakes, and ensure strong lines of communication between hospital staff, patients, and families,” according to Leapfrog, which estimated about 160,000 people die every year from hospital errors, injuries, accidents, and infections.

This marks the 10th anniversary of the Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade.

“Never in history have we seen across-the-board improvement in patient safety until this last decade, coinciding with the history of the Hospital Safety Grade,” Leapfrog Group President and CEO Leah Binder said in a news release. “We salute hospitals for this milestone and encourage them to accelerate their hard work saving patient lives. For a long time, the health care community tried to improve safety, but progress stalled. The big difference over this decade is that for the first time, we publicly reported each hospital’s record on patient safety, and that galvanized the kind of change we all hoped for. It’s not enough change, but we are on the right track.”

Leapfrog said measures that have shown significant improvement over the past decade include two “never events,” incidents of falls and trauma and incidents of objects unintentionally left in a body after surgery, both which decreased by around 25%. There was also encouraging pre-pandemic progress on health care-associated infections for MRSA, CLABSI, and C.Diff.

These improvements saved an estimated 16,000 lives, according to Leapfrog.

Despite the improvements, Leapfrog said more than 1,000 people will die today because of a preventable hospital error, and every year 1-of-25 patients will develop a preventable infection while in the hospital.

“Leapfrog advises the public never to reject emergency treatment based on a safety score, but to consult with a doctor about the best hospital for planned, elective procedures,” the News & Observer of Raleigh previously reported.

But Leapfrog’s study shows that patients at ‘D’ and ‘F’ hospitals face a greater risk of dying than those at hospitals graded A.

The Leapfrog safety grade is divided into two domains: Process/Structural Measures and Outcome Measures.

The Process Measures include:

? Computerized Physician Order Entry

? Bar Code Medication Administration

? ICU Physician Staffing

? Leadership Structures and Systems

? Culture Measurement, Feedback & Intervention

? Nursing Workforce

? Hand Hygiene

? Nurse Communication

? Doctor Communication

? Staff Responsiveness

? Communication about Medicines

? Discharge Information

? Foreign Object Retained

? Air Embolism

? Falls and Trauma

? CLABSI

? SSI: Colon

? C. Diff.

? Pressure Ulcer Rate

? Death Rate among Surgical Inpatients with Serious Treatable Conditions

? Iatrogenic Pneumothorax Rate

? Postoperative Respiratory Failure Rate

? Perioperative PE/DVT Rate

? Postoperative Wound Dehiscence Rate

? Unrecognized Abdominopelvic Accidental Puncture/Laceration Rate

SOURCE: Leapfrog Medical Group

Chop down your Bradford pear, win the ‘bounty’ of a new tree at this Lexington event

The state of South Carolina is so done with Bradford pear trees that it will give you a free bounty to chop yours down.The Clemson Extension Service’s forestry program is offering a bounty on the stinky trees — complete with an Old West-style “wanted” poster — that encourages property owners to chop theirs down by offering a free replacement tree.Any property owner can register online to get their r...

The state of South Carolina is so done with Bradford pear trees that it will give you a free bounty to chop yours down.

The Clemson Extension Service’s forestry program is offering a bounty on the stinky trees — complete with an Old West-style “wanted” poster — that encourages property owners to chop theirs down by offering a free replacement tree.

Any property owner can register online to get their replacement tree at the Lexington event from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Dec. 10 at the Lexington County Public Works Complex, 440 Ball Park Road, Lexington.

All that’s required is that a South Carolina property owner present evidence they did indeed remove a Bradford pear. A selfie with the downed Bradford will be accepted, the extension service says.

The Palmetto State has a long-time love/hate relationship with Bradford pears. The brittle, spindly pear trees were thought to be sterile when they were introduced to South Carolina. But it turns out that pollen from other species can create viable seeds from Bradford flowers and spread the invasive species across the Southeast.

The trees grow in tight thickets that can crowd out native plants, and they produce thorns so fierce they can puncture a tire. The trees are also fragile enough that high winds can leave streets littered with debris. The trees even smell bad, producing an odor that’s been compared to a dead fish.

In 2019, the S.C. Forestry Commission began asking people with Bradfords growing on their property to chop them down, with some calling them a “Frankenstein” plant that has had as destructive an effect on the region as the kudzu vine.

A variety of alternative tree species are available to replace your old Bradford, but they will be handed out on a first-come, first-served basis, so you can’t reserve your favorite ahead of time. Agents on site will help property owners pick out the tree that will be best for their property, said Janet Steele, the extension service’s Lexington-area forestry agent.

Property owners are also responsible for removing the downed Bradford once it’s out of the ground. Up to five Bradfords at a time can be exchanged for new trees.

The new trees are provided as part of a grant from Dominion Energy, a company with an interest in removing invasive tree species from its right-of-ways, Steele said.

Lexington County, SC See Big Upticks in Early Voting

Early voting is off to a big start in South Carolina.Statewide, 285,831 people cast ballots through the first seven days ahead of the Nov. 8 general election. Early voting continues through Nov. 5.The state, which instated excuse-free early voting in May, tallied a total of 100,450 early voters through 11 days ahead of the June primaries (losing one day from the allotted two-week period to the Memorial Day holiday).In Lexington County, the increase from the primaries has been sharper. 14,202 people in the county voted ea...

Early voting is off to a big start in South Carolina.

Statewide, 285,831 people cast ballots through the first seven days ahead of the Nov. 8 general election. Early voting continues through Nov. 5.

The state, which instated excuse-free early voting in May, tallied a total of 100,450 early voters through 11 days ahead of the June primaries (losing one day from the allotted two-week period to the Memorial Day holiday).

In Lexington County, the increase from the primaries has been sharper. 14,202 people in the county voted early through the first seven days ahead of the general election, with five more to go. 3,353 people voted early in the county throughout the entire two weeks ahead of the June primaries — a number that the county had already tripled after just five days ahead of the general election.

There are a variety of factors influencing these spikes in early voting.

A big one is that this is a general election. Turnout for general elections “is historically always much higher than in the primary,” said John Michael Catalano, who handles outreach and voter education for the State Election Commission.

But the evolving rollout of early voting in South Carolina is also having an impact.

“Early voting wasn't implemented in South Carolina until mid-May,” Catalano said. “That was about three weeks before the very first early voting period for the June primary. So there was about three weeks to get early voting established, implemented, everybody trained up and then get the word out to voters. It's a pretty tight time frame to do all of that. So I think one thing that helps is just having enough time for counties to get the word out, for us to get the word out to voters.”

Lenice Shoemaker, Lexington County’s director of registration and elections, also emphasized the importance of having more time to let voters know about early voting.

“I thought the primaries would really be better, but I think ... this is better now that the word is getting out,” she said. “People are really understanding what early voting is about and that people can come and vote curbside if they need to. It's really grown into something that's a whole lot better than it has been before.”

One aspect of early voting impacted by the tight time frame ahead of the primaries was the number of locations.

Lexington County went from one early voting location for the primaries to five ahead of the general election.

And it’s not the only county to see an uptick in the number of locations met with a big increase in the number of early voters. Charleston County, which went from one location to seven, has seen 32,039 early voters through the first seven days (compared to 6,464 throughout primary early voting). Spartanburg County, which went from one location to three, has seen 13,109 early voters through the first seven days (compared to 2,329 throughout primary early voting).

“I don't think it's a stretch to say that opening more locations throughout the county will offer more access to voters and allow more voters to vote early,” Catalano said.

The numbers in Lexington County back this up. While 7,918 of the county’s early votes through the first seven days went through the county Voter Registration and Elections Office in Lexington, the lone early voting site for the primaries, 2,586 went through the Harbison campus of Midlands Technical College in Irmo and 2,430 went through the West Columbia Community Center.

The Pelion Branch Library’s 550 early voters through the first seven days compares favorably to the town’s population (631) — and better than the Batesburg-Leesville campus of Midlands Tech (718 early voters compared to a town population of 5,270).

Shoemaker sees evidence in these numbers that spreading out locations is helping more people early vote but also that there’s still work to do when it comes to educating the public on where and when they can do so.

“I think by us being able to get people a little closer to home, I think that they're able to go, 'I can go ahead and vote now,’” she said, adding the new locations give more county residents the chance to vote on their way home from work or on their lunch break.

In addition to boosting voter turnout, she’s hopeful getting more people voting early can reduce stress on precincts during election day.

“My hopes are that the precincts are bored slack to death, because I want to get them all [voting] now,” she joked.

Early voting continues though Nov. 5 (8:30 a.m.-6 p.m.) at five locations in Lexington County:

South Carolina tops women’s AP Top 25; Stanford, UConn next

South Carolina remained the unanimous No. 1 choice in The Associated Press women's basketball poll released Monday as the Gamecocks keep close watch on the foot injury of reigning Player of the Year Aliyah Boston.The Gamecocks received all 29 first-place votes in the poll released Monday, a day after Boston left a game with her injury. Coach Dawn Staley said Boston was “questionable” going forward but added that the “team doctor wasn’t too, too concerned.”South Carolina’s next game is Tuesday...

South Carolina remained the unanimous No. 1 choice in The Associated Press women's basketball poll released Monday as the Gamecocks keep close watch on the foot injury of reigning Player of the Year Aliyah Boston.

The Gamecocks received all 29 first-place votes in the poll released Monday, a day after Boston left a game with her injury. Coach Dawn Staley said Boston was “questionable” going forward but added that the “team doctor wasn’t too, too concerned.”

South Carolina’s next game is Tuesday at home against No. 15 UCLA.

Stanford remained No. 2 after cruising through a tournament in Hawaii. It's the 618th appearance for Cardinal coach Tara VanDerveer, tying the late Pat Summitt for most all-time. Summitt's teams only missed being in the poll 14 times during her Hall of Fame career at Tennessee.

UConn, Ohio State and Indiana rounded out the top five.

The Huskies are one of four Big East teams to be ranked this week as Marquette entered the poll at No. 24. It's the first time the Big East has four ranked teams since the conference realigned in 2014. The league is 56-14 so far this season, including going 8-2 against ranked teams.

“We’ve been trying to earn a little more respect,” Marquette coach Megan Duffy said of the Big East. “Tried to schedule tougher non-conference (games). 'Nova’s playing people. Us going to the Bahamas was great. Creighton's doing what they've been doing since last season. Getting some of those quality wins is everything.”

North Carolina moved up two spots to No. 6 after rallying to beat then-No. 5 Iowa State in the Phil Knight tournament. The Cyclones fell to eighth.

The Tar Heels visit the Hoosiers on Tuesday in the ACC-Big Ten Challenge. Indiana returns home after winning two games in Las Vegas at a subpar venue that lacked basic necessities.

Notre Dame remained No. 7 while Virginia Tech and Iowa finished off the top 10. At No. 9, Virginia Tech has matched its best ranking ever and is in the top 10 for the first time since 1999.

Tennessee fell out of the poll this week marking the 56th time in the 827-week history of the poll that the Lady Vols weren't ranked. Kansas State also fell out with Gonzaga moving in at No. 23.

FALLING CARDINALS

Louisville dropped to 18th in the poll this week after falling to South Dakota State in the fifth place game at the Battle 4 Atlantis last week. It's the Cardinals lowest ranking since Jan. 11, 2016.

Louisville entered the top 10 in the preseason poll in 2017 and hadn't been out since, a span of 98 consecutive weeks. It was the longest active streak.

“It’s a compliment to the consistency that we built here," Louisville coach Jeff Walz said of being ranked in the top 10 for so long. "Obviously are goal would have been to stay in the top 10, but it’s a new team and growing.”

AP women’s college basketball: https://apnews.com/hub/womens-college-basketball and https://apnews.com/hub/ap-top-25-womens-college-basketball-poll and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

This story was originally published November 28, 2022 1:00 PM.

Lexington Choral Society celebrates 50 years of perfect harmony

Fifty years ago, 14 women in Lexington gathered to start a new singing group to bring women’s choral music to Davidson County. Fast forward to November 2022, the offspring members of that initial group are preparing for its golden anniversary performance on Dec. 3.The Lexington Choral Society began in 1971, when Jo Ann Poston Hill and Bea McCrary turned a conversation at a community pool, into a brand-new singing organization for women.“We both loved to sing, and I was amazed at how much talent there ...

Fifty years ago, 14 women in Lexington gathered to start a new singing group to bring women’s choral music to Davidson County. Fast forward to November 2022, the offspring members of that initial group are preparing for its golden anniversary performance on Dec. 3.

The Lexington Choral Society began in 1971, when Jo Ann Poston Hill and Bea McCrary turned a conversation at a community pool, into a brand-new singing organization for women.

“We both loved to sing, and I was amazed at how much talent there was in this small town. We knew there was a men’s group already, so we said, “Why don’t we start a women’s choral group?” said Hill.

The Lexington Women’s Choral Society began with three directors, Hill, Florence Green and Georgeanna Jordan, and accompanists Marge Team and Sandra Shoaf.

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The group performed for the first time in 1972 at the North Carolina Federation of Music Clubs district meeting. Later that same year, the group performed at the Annual Community Candlelight Service sponsored by the Lexington Music Study Club.

The well-known annual formal concerts, the “Spring Sing” and “Welcome to December” began in 1981. Men joined the women’s group in 1984 to form the Lexington Choral Society of today. From starting with only 14 women, the group has swelled to between 40 and 60 members each season.

Hill said she is not surprised the organization has existed for this many years because the group itself has always been very accepting and encouraging.

“They are such a great group of folks, they are so enthusiastic,” said Hill. “There has never been any auditions, everyone is welcome who loves to do good music.”

Over the years, the group has performed at many local, state, and national events, including the Myrtle Beach Choral Festival-by-the-Sea, the Choral Artist Series of the Piccolo Spoleto Festival in Charleston, SC and the North Carolina Furnishings Festival in High Point.

But the hands-down highlight of the groups history was a performance at Carnegie Hall in New York in 1997. Choral society members gave two solo performances and then joined several different choirs for ensemble performance.

Cheri Murray is the remaining original member of the Lexington Choral Society who joined the group back in 1971. She said that she first joined because she loved to sing, and after 50 years, she still gets the same enjoyment out of it.

“I like a challenge,” said Murray. “We have lots of challenging pieces we have learned to do, and the friendships are marvelous; we have a wonderful time.”

She said one of her favorite memories was performing at Carnegie Hall in New York.

“It was the highlight of our organization,” said Murray.

Hill was director of the Lexington Choral Society for 35 years before handing over the conductor's baton to Phil and Melonie Rector. The couple took over the leadership and continued to direct the group for the next 10 years. In the fall of 2017, Ellen Peterson became director during his 45th-year anniversary season.

Peterson says the organization is still as relevant as it was in 1971 when the fledgling group first began.

“I think it is a great organization that has evolved and developed over 50 years,” said Peterson. “The fact that it still exists and is active in the community speaks a lot about the organization itself. It is great to be the director on its 50th anniversary, and to be only its third director in its history.”

She said the annual “Welcome to December” and “Spring Sing” concerts are still favorites in the community that people look forward to attending.

“The arts are so important in every aspect of our lives whether you realize it or not,” said Peterson. “Around Christmas, it is great that you can go hear tunes you are familiar with but also have some exposure to new and contemporary choral music. It is great to have the opportunity to present choral music to the community, and we are fortunate to have an organization that is keeping choral music alive in Davidson County.”

More:Welcome back: Lexington Choral Society will once again stage its free holiday concert

Ralph Ashley was one of the first male members to join the Lexington Choral Society in 1981, and he is still a member today.

“Choral singing started in high school for me, and it has always been a hobby of mine. I have enjoyed being part of it for all these years. Some of us have been together now for almost 40 years, but we also have some younger members that have the same enjoyment I had when I was younger. It’s a great group,” said Ashley.

Jessie Lockwood is one of the newer members of the Lexington Choral Society. She and her sister have been performing with the group for the past five years. She said she joined the choral society because she wanted to be part of a group of people that shared her love for music.

“There is a sense of belonging and family,” said Lockwood. “We all share the same passion. We all love music, and it makes me happy. The fact that this group has lasted 50 years is a proven testament that music brings the community together.”

Hill said that looking back at the years of the Lexington Choral Society, she is proud that the group is still going strong.

“It’s pretty amazing,” said Hill. “It always touches my heart when I think of the hundreds of people who have come and gone and all they have contributed. Music touches so many lives and it has been wonderful that the Lexington Choral Society has been able to do that.”

The Lexington Choral Society will be performing its annual “Welcome to December!” concert on Saturday, Dec. 3 at 5 p.m. at First United Methodist Church located at 310 S. Main Street in Lexington.

For more information go to www.lexingtonchoralsociety.org

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