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Electrician Contractor in Dentsville, SC

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We Keep Dentsville Shining Bright

Electricity – it’s one of the most important innovations in the history of humankind. It’s hard to imagine life without electricity, and for good reason. Nearly every aspect of our lives is affected by electricity in some form or fashion, from the way you wash your clothes to the effort you put in at work. From a residential standpoint, you need it to cook, clean, entertain, and live comfortably. For commercial purposes, electricity is used to power the computers needed to keep America moving. That’s why, when the electricity in your home or at your job is compromised, life grinds to a halt. Unfortunately, electrical problems are inevitable in today’s day and age. When the electricity in your home or commercial workspace fails, you need a quick, effective solution that will get your life back on track. And that, in a nutshell, is where L&M Electric, Inc. shines the brightest.

Our company was founded in 2009 by Roger Lee and John Mezzles. With a combined 46 years of electrical experience, the two entrepreneurs set out to create a company that offers quality workmanship and unparalleled service to all its builders and clients. Today, we are proud to have served South Carolina for nearly two decades as the premier electrician contractor in Dentsville, SC. Our family-owned business specializes in both residential and commercial electrical work. Our highly-trained team has the experience and skills to handle any electrical issue, from minor panel breaker problems to large-scale industrial issues.

Despite winning numerous awards and recognitions in the Southeast, we don’t let our accolades go to our head. Our team is committed to providing effective, personalized electrical work for every one of our customers. We take pride in our ability to offer peace of mind to our customers when they need it most, and that’s exactly what we aim to provide to you too. We’re talking one-on-one service provided by a friendly, professional electrician. There are no corners cut, no hidden fees, and no excuses – only the highest quality work from the finest electricians in Dentsville.

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What sets us apart from other electricians in Dentsville, SC? It boils down to three reasons:
Customer-Centric, Quality Electric Service
Customer-Centric, Quality Electric Service

As guests in your home, you won’t ever have to worry about a member of our team trying to sell you something you don’t need. Our job is to serve your electrical needs. You expect the highest quality electrical work in South Carolina, and that’s what we will provide.

Experienced, Affordable Electricians
Experienced, Affordable Electricians

You understand that the highest quality work requires fair compensation, but you’re not made of money. Our commitment is to offer affordable electric work at a price you’re satisfied paying.

Family Owned & Operated
Family Owned & Operated

We know that you are choosing L&M Electric for a reason. Unlike large corporations, we truly care about our customers. As a family business, serving you is personal for us. We stake our reputation on the quality of our work. As such, we are accountable and will always strive to deliver the service you have come to expect from our company.

Affordable Electric Service That Makes You Feel Like Family

At L&M Electric, we employ the brightest commercial and residential electricians in Dentsville. Having electricians that specialize in both residential and commercial projects allow us to provide our customers with a wider range of services.

Our team fixes a broad range of electrical issues, but we have built our reputation on the following electric services:

Affordable Electric Service That Makes You Feel Like Family

Electrical Repairs

Every homeowner has to deal with an electrical component breaking or failing at some point. When that happens, you need a partner who can troubleshoot the problem and correct the issue efficiently and effectively. A few common problems that we help solve for our customers include:

  • Ceiling Fan Repair
  • Light Fixture Repair
  • Light Switch & Outlet Repair
  • Electrical Safety Inspection

Electrical Installations

Whether you have a new ceiling fan that needs to be installed or you have a new electrical outlet that you’d like added to your bedroom, L&M Electric is here to help. Our team installs quality solutions every day of the week – there’s no electrical installation job your residential electrician in Dentsville, SC, can’t handle. Here is a glance at some of the installation projects that we complete for homeowners:

  • Smart Home Installation
  • Electric Car Charging Station Installation
  • Whole-Home Surge Protection Installation

Renovations and Remodeling

If you’re renovating or remodeling your home, you need a professional electrician on-hand to work to properly install your new electrical devices and systems. Our skilled electricians are happy to work with you or your remodeling consultant to install your lights and keep your home shining bright. Common renovation and remodeling jobs include:

  • Hot Tub Wiring
  • Kitchen Lighting Renovations
  • Finished Basement Electrical Wiring

New Construction Electrical Projects

Many new construction homeowners stress about having their electrical system wired from scratch. For us, it’s just another day on the job. If you’re building your dream home, don’t leave your electrical work to mediocre electricians. Trust L&M electric for reliable service and the highest quality electrical work in Dentsville. A few new construction projects we handle are:

  • Breaker Panel Box Installation
  • Wiring for Backup Generator
  • Landscape Lighting Outdoors
  • Low Voltage Wiring

Your Residential Electrician in Dentsville, SC

When you own a home, there’s something inherently fulfilling about taking care of your property and fixing issues that pop up over time. When it comes to electrical work, however, DIY projects can be dangerous. Electricity is an amazing innovation, but if you aren’t fully trained and licensed to handle such work, it’s best to leave it to the experts at L&M Electric. Your home’s safety is essential for you and your family. Our team will go above and beyond to ensure that your home’s electrical system is operating correctly without any concerning problems.

With more than 60 years of combined experience as electricians, we are capable of troubleshooting and fixing a litany of electrical issues in your house. Keep reading to learn more about the most common electrical issues our customers report, along with some handy tips on how to remediate such problems.

Your Residential Electrician

Panel Breaker is Tripped

If you don’t have any power in your home, it might be time to check your electrical panel to see if there are any tripped breakers. If you spot a tripped breaker, try your best to switch it over to its original position. If you can’t, remember that some breakers need to be flipped to the “off” position before turning it back on. If you don’t have any luck, give our office a call. We’ll send a trained residential electrician in Dentsville to your home to fix the problem on-site.

Panel Breaker is Tripped

Overhead Fan Stops Working

If you have an overhead fan in your living room or bedroom, you know how quickly it can accumulate dust. Most homeowners clean up using a rod duster. However, sometimes homeowners accidentally hit the fan direction switch when doing so. But, instead of flipping it “on” or “off,” they bump it into a limbo zone where neither direction is selected. When this happens, your overhead fan will not spin. If one of your fans stops working suddenly, this is one of the most common reasons why. If you’re sure you didn’t hit the fan direction switch, it could be an indication of a larger problem. In this case, call our office for a free phone consultation. We’ll troubleshoot with you over the phone and if necessary, send out an electrician.

Overhead Fan Stops Working

Kitchen Breaker Keeps Tripping

If your home was built in the last 35 years, chances are it has two 20-amp circuits running to your kitchen countertop outlets. Newer homes will have three circuits. If you’re constantly tripping the breaker to your kitchen, it’s most likely because you have too many electrical devices connected to the same circuit. To help alleviate this problem, place appliances like coffee makers and toasters on two different circuits. That way, they can share the load.

At the end of the day, your home is your place of solitude and relaxation. But, when you have electrical issues in your home, things can quickly go from peaceful to problematic. Whether you’re renovating your home and need a new room wired for power or your panel breaker keeps giving your problems, L&M Electric is here to assist. If you have questions about an issue or need to schedule service, our team is ready to help answer your questions and coordinate the best time for a residential electrician to come to your home in Dentsville.

Kitchen Breaker Keeps Tripping

Tips to Save Money and Maintain Your Home’s Electrical Systems

Unlike some of our competitors, who are reluctant to provide any information that might prevent them from making a buck, L&M Electric is all about empowering our customers. If we can offer sound advice that will educate our clients and help them save money, we have no problem doing so. That’s why we have put together some helpful tips and tricks for maintaining your home’s most common electrical systems. Because, at the end of the day, a little knowledge can go a long way when it comes to your family’s safety.

Install-Surge-Protectors

Install Surge Protectors

Intense lighting storms can cause powerful surges of electricity that ruin your home’s electrical appliances and amenities. Surge protectors installed at your electrical panel can help prevent these surges by grounding the electricity running through your home. They do so by directing it away from your electrical devices. This common solution is inexpensive, effective, and always a better choice than replacing expensive items like TVs and computers.

Examine Your Breaker Panel

Examine Your Breaker Panel

Breaker panels control the power to your home. When they go bad or are damaged, there’s a good chance that you will lose power to most of the rooms in your house. Open your breaker panel and keep a sharp eye out for signs of corrosion and rust. Double-check that each breaker you see flips on and off properly. If you notice corrosion or if the breaker switches won’t flip, it’s time to get in touch with a residential electrician in Dentsville, SC, who can inspect your breaker panel and recommend upgrades if necessary.

Test Your GFIs

Test Your GFIs

GFIs, or Ground Fault Interrupters, are similar to surge protectors in that they prevent electrical damage from happening in your home. The primary job of a GFI is to prevent electrical shocks that happen during a ground fault. Because water is a conductor of electricity, GFIs should be installed anywhere that an outlet comes into contact with water. You should try to test your GFIs every month, if possible, to ensure that they are working correctly. When you look closely at your GFI, you will notice a “test” and a “reset” button. Hit the “test” button to trip the GFI outlet and then hit “reset” to restore power. If your outlet resets, your GFI is working as it should. If not, you need to replace your GFI outlet. Because electricity is involved, we recommend hiring a professional to install new GFIs in your home. That way, you know the job is done right.

Replace-Outdated-Light-Bulbs

Replace Outdated Light Bulbs

The right light bulb can add the perfect amount of ambiance to your home. Eventually, however, even the best light bulbs will need replacing. While they don’t need checking every month, it’s a good idea to inspect all your bulbs at the beginning of the year. If any of your bulbs are dead, you should replace them. You should also consider replacing bulbs that are incandescent with LED lights. LED light bulbs may cost more upfront but use less electricity and are more efficient over the long run.

Schedule a Home Safety Inspection

Schedule a Home Safety Inspection

In terms of preventative maintenance, scheduling a safety inspection for your home’s electrical systems should be a high priority. These inspections will shine a light on the electrical features in your home that need to be fixed. Most modern electrical fires are caused by short circuit arcs, defective insulation, or broken wiring. An inspection conducted by a qualified electrician will help determine what needs to be fixed so you and your family stay safe in your home. Your inspector should cover your whole home and will examine common features such as:

  • Breakers
  • Fans
  • Exposed Wiring
  • Electrical Panels
  • Circuits
  • Switches
  • Outlets and More
QUALITY-ELECTRICAL-SERVICE

DELIVERING QUALITY ELECTRICAL SERVICE TO 5,000+ HOMES PER YEAR

he electrical system in your home brings it to life from the lights and appliances we use every day to the entertainment we all love and enjoy. You want an electrician that makes you feel safe while delivering the quality services you’re promised.

ELECTRICIAN SERVICE REQUEST

Full-Service Electrical Work for Home and Business

Whether you need light switch services for your newly renovated home or need a generator installed at your commercial property, L&M Electric is here to serve you. Our team will get the job done right, so you can get back to loving your life in the Lowcountry.

Coantact Us
Full-Service Electrical Work for Home and Business

Latest News in Dentsville

Marshall Tucker, Columbia’s blind piano tuner, not the band

The Marshall Tucker Band was one of the innovators in the genre of Southern Rock music. From Spartanburg, the band had hit singles including “Heard It In a Love Song,” “Fire On The Mountain,” “Can’t You See,” and “Take The Highway.” The band earned seven gold and three platinum albums. The Marshall Tucker Band has also influenced major country acts, including Alabama and Travis Tritt, among others.However, the band’s name did not come from anyone who was actually a member....

The Marshall Tucker Band was one of the innovators in the genre of Southern Rock music. From Spartanburg, the band had hit singles including “Heard It In a Love Song,” “Fire On The Mountain,” “Can’t You See,” and “Take The Highway.” The band earned seven gold and three platinum albums. The Marshall Tucker Band has also influenced major country acts, including Alabama and Travis Tritt, among others.

However, the band’s name did not come from anyone who was actually a member.

Marshall Tucker, the man, is still alive and well. Now, 94-years-old, he and his wife Lois live in Columbia and remain active. There is much more to Tucker’s story than just his name being used for a popular band.

Tucker was a full time piano tuner for almost 50 years, and has been blind since birth.

He attended a boarding school for the deaf and blind when he was a child, and met a man there who was tuning a piano.

“I kept hearing him play just one note at a time and asked him why he keeps playing the ‘F’ note over and over,” Tucker said. “He asked me, ‘well how did you know it was an F note’ and I said, well I just know.”

Tucker later discovered that he had the gift of perfect pitch, which he said is simply “God-given.” This talent came in handy when tuning pianos, and it allowed him to tune many well-known performers’ pianos over the years, including Lawrence Welk and pianist Liberace.

He married his wife Lois in 1972, who was also born blind. Both Marshall and Lois attend Cavalry Baptist Church every Sunday, where he plays the piano for the choir and she teaches Sunday school.

According to Tucker, he did not know his name was used for a band until a few years after they had named it.

“I didn’t know about the Marshall Tucker band until 1972. I was at a friend’s house and the friend told me he saw I was going to be playing tonight,” said Tucker. “I said no I’m not going to be playing, I’m just sitting here with you.”

Tucker said he found out that the band had been using a work space he had formerly rented for piano tuning. His landlord had accidentally left the old tag on the key when giving it to the new tenants. The band was using the space one day, discussing their name.

“When they found my name on the key tag, I was told one of them said, ‘I tell ya what, let’s just name it the Marshall Tucker band and go eat supper.” Tucker said he was not there at the time, but that was what he was told.

When asked if Tucker still frequently thinks about the Marshall Tucker Band, he said he mainly thinks about how far his name has gotten around the world.

“In a way, my name has been as far as Russia,” he said. “My mother always told me, ‘son, your name will go further than your face,’ and that is for sure.”

‘I just feel like a failure.’ An emotional day in court during SC’s eviction crisis

Sporting a set of blue scrubs, Tonez Wilson fidgeted in his seat as he waited for his name to be called. The 23-year-old was set to graduate from his nursing program in a week and should have been in class that morning. Instead he was at the Richland County Central Court in Dentsville, fighting to not be evicted from his apartment.In the past two months he had racked up $1,417.80 in back rent. Now, after four years of renting with the same company, the landlord wanted him out.Wilson is one of ten tenants who passed through Magi...

Sporting a set of blue scrubs, Tonez Wilson fidgeted in his seat as he waited for his name to be called. The 23-year-old was set to graduate from his nursing program in a week and should have been in class that morning. Instead he was at the Richland County Central Court in Dentsville, fighting to not be evicted from his apartment.

In the past two months he had racked up $1,417.80 in back rent. Now, after four years of renting with the same company, the landlord wanted him out.

Wilson is one of ten tenants who passed through Magistrate Judge Phillip F. Newsom’s courtroom on Wednesday, Oct. 27, and one of countless others nationwide who face the possibility of losing their housing.

Tenants who fell on hard times at the start of the pandemic were temporarily shielded from eviction by a federal moratorium. Those protections ran out in August, but many are still struggling to get back on their feet.

Even before COVID-19, South Carolina had the highest eviction rate of any state in the country, according to research from Princeton University’s Eviction Lab.

Sue Berkowitz, executive director of the S.C. Appleseed Justice Center, said despite the far reaching consequences of evictions, it is one of the most overlooked issues in the state.

“A lack of stable affordable housing in South Carolina, along with laws that make it fairly easy to evict, has led to a crisis. And there’s no reason to think things won’t be as bad or even worse with this pandemic.”

Under South Carolina law, landlords can evict a tenant if they fail to pay rent within five days of the due date or if they violate the terms of their lease. That includes staying past the end date on the lease.

Landlords — many of whom have spent months waiting to collect rent because of the moratorium — say filing for eviction is often the only tool they have to help recoup their losses.

The State spent a day in magistrate court observing eviction hearings and interviewing tenants to put a face to the problem advocates have long warned about.

Some of those threatened with eviction had fallen behind on rent because they lost their jobs, had their pay cut or faced a medical emergency. Others simply misunderstood the terms of their lease.

Eight of the tenants were people of color. One was not fluent in English and needed a translator. None of them had a lawyer. All of them were hoping to stay in their homes, or at least buy some time before they had to go.

The information in this story came from both court testimony and interviews with The State.

The reason Wilson started nursing school in the first place was to make more money. But eventually balancing school and work became untenable, and he was let go from his job as a transporter at Prisma Health due to scheduling conflicts.

Though he works part time at a senior living facility on the weekends, that job doesn’t pay enough to cover his rent and so he fell short in August and September. He applied for help through Richland County’s Emergency Rental Assistance Program but was still waiting to hear back when he found an eviction notice taped to his door a few weeks ago.

“I guess I was kind of expecting it, but I wasn’t expecting it so soon,” he said.

When Judge Newsom asked how he planned to come up with the $1,480.70, Wilson assured him that he had been accepted into the program, his rental assistance check was on the way and he had a job lined up for after graduation.

“We try to help our tenants out when we can,” his landlord, Will Fowler, said.

The judge granted Wilson twelve days to pay off the debt.

Wilson was thankful for the second chance, but knew there was no guarantee that the rent assistance would arrive in time. Without that check, he’d have no choice but to move.

But Wilson was trying not to focus on that. Instead his mind was on his graduation. If all goes as planned, he will earn his Practical Nursing Diploma from ECPI University. From there he hopes to get an associate degree and become a Registered Nurse.

“At this point, all I can do is wait,” he said.

“You can raise your left hand since you clearly can’t raise your right.” Judge Newsom told Lisa Belton.

When she appeared before him that Wednesday she was recovering from a recent surgery and had her right arm in a sling. The more than $3,000 she paid in medical bills caused her to be late on rent in September.

Belton and her landlord, Cornie J. Davis, had a tense relationship. She told the judge he skimped on necessary repairs. He claimed she never had the rent on time.

Still whenever she had been late in the past, she said he was usually lenient so long as she paid a penalty. This time was different.

“I’m fed up,” Davis told the judge. “I try to be nice but every time I’m nice people walk all over me.”

Belton and her husband had been searching for a new place to live for the past year but had come up empty-handed. Now they would have to scramble at the last minute to find something.

“It just feels like bad luck, bad timing,” she said. While she watched friends and family struggle to get through 2020, she had been able to hold on to her job and tough it out. “Now after all that things are falling apart just as we were getting ready to go.”

The judge gave her until Nov. 3 to move out. Now she said she has to figure out how to pack up her whole house with just one arm.

Eight months. That’s how long it’s been since Lisa Holmes has paid her rent in full.

The problem started in February when she was switched from a sales position at her company to a different job. The money she made from commissions usually helped her get over the hump each month.

Short on cash, she tried to find ways to cut back but realized no matter how many pennies she pinched, she wasn’t going to make rent.

Then, she stumbled on what she thought would be her saving grace: the Center for Disease Control’s eviction moratorium.

“I just signed this form and submitted it to my landlord and it halted any evictions.” she said.

She hoped the moratorium would buy her some time to get switched back to her old sales job. But as the months went by, nothing changed at work and the bills continued to pile up. By April, she was fired for taking too many sick days.

Then in August the moment she had been dreading finally arrived. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the eviction moratorium for good. Within a matter of months she received the eviction notice that she thought she’d be able to avoid. By that point she owed more than $8,300.

The judge explained that she had until Nov. 3 to pay off her debt and until Nov. 5 to pay $1,200 for that month’s rent.

Though she applied for Richland County’s Emergency Rental Assistance Program in August, she is still waiting to get approved.

Holmes said she knows she won’t have the money in time, but she’s hoping that if she can at least show her landlord a letter of approval from the rent assistance program, then he’ll agree to work with her.

“COVID was already stressful enough as it was but this just added a whole other layer on to it,” she said

When Heather Griffith received the notice stating that her lease would not be renewed and she had until the end of the month to leave, she couldn’t believe it.

She and her 14-year-old son had lived at the same mobile home park for the past 9 years. At $400 a month, it was the only two-bedroom she could afford.

Though she’d been threatened with eviction several times before for missing rent, “we were always able to work something out,” she said. “We never even made it to court before.”

She was confident it would be the same this time. But as the hearing drew closer, reality began to sink in.

When she finally appeared before the judge, Griffith didn’t know what to expect.

“Can you tell me why you haven’t moved even though your lease is up?” he asked.

Griffith told him she had nowhere to go and thought she could fight the decision in court. Her voice began to trail off as she choked back tears.

“Unfortunately the law doesn’t support you doing that.” Judge Newsom said, noting that her landlord could actually sue her for damages. “I have to issue the writ, I have no choice.”

He gave her until Nov. 3 to move.

Heather wasn’t sentimental about leaving the mobile home park. She had dreamed of getting out of there for years. But with poor credit and an eviction on her record, she knew finding a new place in a week would be close to impossible.

“I just feel like a failure,” she said.

Editor’s Note: The State reached out to Richland County to ask about Wilson and Holmes’ rent assistance applications. A spokesperson said the county could not discuss individual cases, but that it typically takes four to six weeks for an application to be approved, and another 21 working days for the payment to be made. The county said other factors can result in delays for approval or payment.

Unbekanntes (usrprünglich als Erdbeben) gemeldetes Ereignis: Lexington County, 22 km südlich von Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina, USA, am Freitag, 19. Nov 2021 um 22:06 Lokalzeit -

Datum und Zeit: 20 Nov 2021 03:06:30 UTC - vor 4 TagenOrtszeit am Epizentrum: Freitag, 19. Nov. 2021 22:06 (GMT -5) Magnitude: 3? Erdbebentiefe: 10.0 km Epizentrum geogr. Breite / Länge: 33.81338°N / 81.09833°W? (Lexington, ...

Datum und Zeit: 20 Nov 2021 03:06:30 UTC - vor 4 TagenOrtszeit am Epizentrum: Freitag, 19. Nov. 2021 22:06 (GMT -5) Magnitude: 3? Erdbebentiefe: 10.0 km Epizentrum geogr. Breite / Länge: 33.81338°N / 81.09833°W? (Lexington, South Carolina, Vereinigte Staaten) Seismischer Gegenpol: 33.813°S / 98.902°E? Orte und Städte in der Nähe:0 km SSE von Gaston (pop: 1,660) --> Erdbeben in der Nähe!17 km S von Cayce (pop: 13,600) --> Erdbeben in der Nähe!20 km S von West Columbia (pop: 16,100) --> Erdbeben in der Nähe!22 km SSW von Columbia (pop: 133,800) --> Erdbeben in der Nähe!23 km SE von Lexington (pop: 20,100) --> Erdbeben in der Nähe!25 km SSW von Forest Acres (pop: 10,600) --> Erdbeben in der Nähe!26 km S von Saint Andrews (pop: 21,200) --> Erdbeben in der Nähe!27 km S von Seven Oaks (pop: 15,100) --> Erdbeben in der Nähe!31 km SSW von Dentsville (pop: 14,100) --> Erdbeben in der Nähe!672 km SSW von Washington (District of Columbia) (pop: 601,700) --> Erdbeben in der Nähe!

Wetter am Epizentrum zum Zeitpunkt des Bebens: Clear Sky 5.6°C (42 F), humidity: 50%, wind: 3 m/s (6 kts) from ENE

Primäre Datenquelle: VolcanoDiscovery

Get home made foods, local goods at Cooksey's Store in Dentsville

For more than a century, customers have stopped and shopped at Cooksey’s Store on the corner of Charles Street and Wheatley Road in Dentsville.Cooksey’s Store was established in 1896 by the Cooksey family, who ran the business until the mid-1980s. The store was later sold and then eventually purchased by its current owners, Mel and Beverly Bridgett, in 1994.“Way back in the day when the Cookseys owned it ... this was the store,” Mel said. “There was no Safeway. This was the store.”&ldq...

For more than a century, customers have stopped and shopped at Cooksey’s Store on the corner of Charles Street and Wheatley Road in Dentsville.

Cooksey’s Store was established in 1896 by the Cooksey family, who ran the business until the mid-1980s. The store was later sold and then eventually purchased by its current owners, Mel and Beverly Bridgett, in 1994.

“Way back in the day when the Cookseys owned it ... this was the store,” Mel said. “There was no Safeway. This was the store.”

“You could buy everything from boots to ammunition to you-name-it,” he said. “My father, who’s passed away now, came here and bartered back in the ’30s. He would bring some eggs and trade for a loaf of bread.”

Today, Cooksey’s serves as a country market with an expanded kitchen to service the hungry needs of the local community, and is managed on a full-time basis by Mel and Beverly’s daughter, Rita Earnshaw. The store still has the original pine floors that add to its country charm.

“We took it over in 1994,” Mel said. “You might be able to come in here and get a sandwich, but you couldn’t get fried chicken or breakfast sandwiches first thing in the morning made for you right off the griddle. You couldn’t get any of that. Crab cakes, there was nothing like that here.”

The store now offers carry-out breakfast, lunch and dinner meals cooked to order, fried chicken, sides, along with salads, crab cakes and country sausage home made by Beverly.

“Everyday we have a special, as far as food,” Beverly said.

Mel said the breakfast sandwiches, crab cakes, fried chicken and sausage are some of the more popular food items for customers.

“The focal points of the store, really, in the deli, are the breakfast sandwiches in the morning,” he said. “People come from miles away for the chicken, the crab cakes, homemade country sausage.”

Beverly said that people come from “everywhere” and “in every direction” to buy her homemade crab cakes, too.

“We have people that buy them … and send them back to Florida or wherever they’re going through,” she said, “They get enough to last them until they come back through.”

Mel said that most of the meats, produce, oysters, Amish baked food items and other goods offered by Cooksey’s are supplied by vendors in the area.

Customers can also find cured hams and slab bacon brought in from Smithfield, N.C.

“They come from North Carolina from a little, small operation,” Mel said. “I found them when I was on a little trip.”

Beverly said the store is now taking orders for stuffed hams for the upcoming holiday season.

The shelves at Cooksey’s are stocked with jars of homestyle preserves, apple butter, relish, pickles, sauces, bean salads and more from McCutcheon’s in Frederick.

“McCutcheon’s is a famous Maryland name for jellies, jams, pickles, cider,” Mel said. “Very famous.”

Maryland-themed products and engraved glassware crafted by local artisans, and scented candles can be purchased as well.

The store also has a gas station out front so customers can fuel-up for their travels.

“There aren’t many of these stores left,” Mel said.

“We had the concept right from the start in 1994,” he said. “To go back to make this the focus of the community. To make it a community market, not a convenience store … we have some convenient things, but we’re a country market.”

Dentsville woman hospitalized for copperhead bite

When Janet Gummere first felt the sharp, stinging pain in her left foot, her first thought was that she had somehow sprained her toe.But when she looked down, she was surprised to see a short, slender snake that didn’t look or act like the black snakes that she sees regularly in her garden.“Black snakes usually disappear quickly because they’re scared of people,” the Dentsville resident said. “This snake held its ground.”Gummere said that she had been walking from her kitchen to her dr...

When Janet Gummere first felt the sharp, stinging pain in her left foot, her first thought was that she had somehow sprained her toe.

But when she looked down, she was surprised to see a short, slender snake that didn’t look or act like the black snakes that she sees regularly in her garden.

“Black snakes usually disappear quickly because they’re scared of people,” the Dentsville resident said. “This snake held its ground.”

Gummere said that she had been walking from her kitchen to her driveway Thursday night to retrieve something from her car when the snake bit her left big toe through her slipper. At first, when she took off the slipper, all she saw was a tiny drop of blood. But within minutes, her foot and ankle began to swell.

Gummere said she immediately jumped in her car and drove to the emergency room at the University of Maryland Charles Regional Medical Center in La Plata.

“It probably wasn’t smart for me to drive myself, but I did,” Gummere said with a chuckle.

By the time she got to the hospital, her left leg below the knee was swollen and blue, and she could hardly put any weight on it.

“I just couldn’t believe anything so small could cause so much hurt,” Gummere said. “It was like streaks of pain.”

At the hospital, the doctors told her that she had been bitten by a copperhead snake.

Copperheads are among the most common snakes in North America. They grow to an average of 2 to 3 feet in length, and are easily identified by their tan or brown color and hourglass-shaped stripes. Their heads are copper colored, which is where their name comes from.

While copperheads are aggressive and therefore likely to bite, their venom is mild and fatalities from copperhead bites are rare. According to the Maryland Poison Center, which is part of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, fewer than 10 people nationwide die from snake bites every year.

That’s not to say that copperhead bites aren’t extremely painful, as Gummere can tell you.

The Maryland Poison Center recommends the following steps for responding to a snake bite of any kind:

• If the bite victim is having trouble breathing or is beginning to lose consciousness, call 911 immediately. Otherwise, call the Maryland Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222.

• Clean the bite area with soap and water, and cover the bite with a clean dressing, unless this would interfere with immediate treatment.

• Make note of the snake’s color and shape if possible, but stay safely far away and don’t try to get close to get a photo.

• Let doctors or first responders know the time that the bite occurred.

Never try to restrict blood flow to the area around a snake bite, for example by applying a tourniquet, or apply heat or ice to the wound area. Bite victims should never attempt to cut a snake bite wound or suck out the venom.

According to the Maryland Poison Center, pets, children and people with compromised immune systems are at greater risk of having serious reactions to copperhead venom.

Gummere ended up spending two days in the hospital recovering from her bite and then visited her doctor for a follow-up.

“My doctor said, ‘you were very lucky,’” Gummere said.

Gummere said that in the 40 years she’s lived in Dentsville, she’s never seen a copperhead.

“I think we’re seeing something of a resurgence of this particular snake in Southern Maryland,” said Jonathan McKnight, a biologist with the Department of Natural Resources. “We’ve seen an overall increase in the amount of woodlands in the region over the past century, which is the copperhead’s natural habitat.”

McKnight said that reports of snake bites increased in 2017, but so far this year the number has not been out of the ordinary.

McKnight speculated that the fluctuation in the number of reported snake bites is not due to changes in the snake population or habitat, but rather to people spending more time in areas where they are likely to encounter snakes such as parks and wildlife areas.

He also said that changes in people’s behavior are also a factor.

“People are less likely to kill snakes now than they used to,” McKnight said. “They’re giving snakes more elbow room than they used to.”

McKnight says that the best way to avoid getting bitten by a snake is to have greater awareness of one’s surroundings.

“The snake bite stories I hear over and over are people saying things like, ‘I was moving my wood pile’ or ‘I was turning my kayak over for the first time since last year,’” McKnight said. “If people have situational awareness that they’re sharing the environment with snakes, then they’ll remember to look before they reach.”

It’s a lesson that Gummere will take to heart.

“I like to work in my garden, but my son told me, ‘From now on, you have to wear boots,’” she said.

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