Skip to main content

Electrician Contractor in Ariel, SC

Ask us Anything770-978-2300

Quick Quote

We Keep Ariel Shining Bright

Electricity - it's one of the most important innovations in the history of humankind. It's hard to imagine life without electricity, and for good reason. Nearly every aspect of our lives is affected by electricity in some form or fashion, from the way you wash your clothes to the effort you put in at work. From a residential standpoint, you need it to cook, clean, entertain, and live comfortably. For commercial purposes, electricity is used to power the computers needed to keep America moving. That's why, when the electricity in your home or at your job is compromised, life grinds to a halt. Unfortunately, electrical problems are inevitable in today's day and age. When the electricity in your home or commercial workspace fails, you need a quick, effective solution that will get your life back on track. And that, in a nutshell, is where L&M Electric, Inc. shines the brightest.

Our company was founded in 2009 by Roger Lee and John Mezzles. With a combined 46 years of electrical experience, the two entrepreneurs set out to create a company that offers quality workmanship and unparalleled service to all its builders and clients. Today, we are proud to have served South Carolina for nearly two decades as the premier electrician contractor in Ariel, SC. Our family-owned business specializes in both residential and commercial electrical work. Our highly-trained team has the experience and skills to handle any electrical issue, from minor panel breaker problems to large-scale industrial issues.

Despite winning numerous awards and recognitions in the Southeast, we don't let our accolades go to our head. Our team is committed to providing effective, personalized electrical work for every one of our customers. We take pride in our ability to offer peace of mind to our customers when they need it most, and that's exactly what we aim to provide to you too. We're talking one-on-one service provided by a friendly, professional electrician. There are no corners cut, no hidden fees, and no excuses - only the highest quality work from the finest electricians in Ariel.

Service Areas

Special Offer!

$99 Electrical Home Safety Inspection

Learn More
What sets us apart from other electricians in Ariel, SC? It boils down to three reasons:
Customer-Centric, Quality Electric Service
Customer-Centric, Quality Electric Service

As guests in your home, you won't ever have to worry about a member of our team trying to sell you something you don't need. Our job is to serve your electrical needs. You expect the highest quality electrical work in South Carolina, and that's what we will provide.

Experienced, Affordable Electricians
Experienced, Affordable Electricians

You understand that the highest quality work requires fair compensation, but you're not made of money. Our commitment is to offer affordable electric work at a price you're satisfied paying.

Family Owned & Operated
Family Owned & Operated

We know that you are choosing L&M Electric for a reason. Unlike large corporations, we truly care about our customers. As a family business, serving you is personal for us. We stake our reputation on the quality of our work. As such, we are accountable and will always strive to deliver the service you have come to expect from our company.

Affordable Electric Service That Makes You Feel Like Family

At L&M Electric, we employ the brightest commercial and residential electricians in Ariel. Having electricians that specialize in both residential and commercial projects allow us to provide our customers with a wider range of services.

Our team fixes a broad range of electrical issues, but we have built our reputation on the following electric services:

 Smart Home Electrician Ariel, SC

Electrical Repairs

Every homeowner has to deal with an electrical component breaking or failing at some point. When that happens, you need a partner who can troubleshoot the problem and correct the issue efficiently and effectively. A few common problems that we help solve for our customers include:

  • Ceiling Fan Repair
  • Light Fixture Repair
  • Light Switch & Outlet Repair
  • Electrical Safety Inspection
 Smart Home Installation Ariel, SC

Electrical Installations

Whether you have a new ceiling fan that needs to be installed or you have a new electrical outlet that you'd like added to your bedroom, L&M Electric is here to help. Our team installs quality solutions every day of the week - there's no electrical installation job your residential electrician in Ariel, SC, can't handle. Here is a glance at some of the installation projects that we complete for homeowners:

  • Smart Home Installation
  • Electric Car Charging Station Installation
  • Whole-Home Surge Protection Installation
 Electrical Repairs Ariel, SC

Renovations and Remodeling

If you're renovating or remodeling your home, you need a professional electrician on-hand to work to properly install your new electrical devices and systems. Our skilled electricians are happy to work with you or your remodeling consultant to install your lights and keep your home shining bright. Common renovation and remodeling jobs include:

  • Hot Tub Wiring
  • Kitchen Lighting Renovations
  • Finished Basement Electrical Wiring
 Electrical Safety Inspection Company Ariel, SC

New Construction Electrical Projects

Many new construction homeowners stress about having their electrical system wired from scratch. For us, it's just another day on the job. If you're building your dream home, don't leave your electrical work to mediocre electricians. Trust L&M electric for reliable service and the highest quality electrical work in Ariel. A few new construction projects we handle are:

  • Breaker Panel Box Installation
  • Wiring for Backup Generator
  • Landscape Lighting Outdoors
  • Low Voltage Wiring
 Whole Home Electrical Install Ariel, SC

Your Residential Electrician in Ariel, SC

When you own a home, there's something inherently fulfilling about taking care of your property and fixing issues that pop up over time. When it comes to electrical work, however, DIY projects can be dangerous. Electricity is an amazing innovation, but if you aren't fully trained and licensed to handle such work, it's best to leave it to the experts at L&M Electric. Your home's safety is essential for you and your family. Our team will go above and beyond to ensure that your home's electrical system is operating correctly without any concerning problems.

With more than 60 years of combined experience as electricians, we are capable of troubleshooting and fixing a litany of electrical issues in your house. Keep reading to learn more about the most common electrical issues our customers report, along with some handy tips on how to remediate such problems.

Electrical Services Ariel, SC

Panel Breaker is Tripped

If you don't have any power in your home, it might be time to check your electrical panel to see if there are any tripped breakers. If you spot a tripped breaker, try your best to switch it over to its original position. If you can't, remember that some breakers need to be flipped to the "off" position before turning it back on. If you don't have any luck, give our office a call. We'll send a trained residential electrician in Ariel to your home to fix the problem on-site.

 Remodel And Renovation Electrical Work Ariel, SC

Overhead Fan Stops Working

If you have an overhead fan in your living room or bedroom, you know how quickly it can accumulate dust. Most homeowners clean up using a rod duster. However, sometimes homeowners accidentally hit the fan direction switch when doing so. But, instead of flipping it "on" or "off," they bump it into a limbo zone where neither direction is selected. When this happens, your overhead fan will not spin. If one of your fans stops working suddenly, this is one of the most common reasons why. If you're sure you didn't hit the fan direction switch, it could be an indication of a larger problem. In this case, call our office for a free phone consultation. We'll troubleshoot with you over the phone and if necessary, send out an electrician.

 Electrician Ariel, SC

Kitchen Breaker Keeps Tripping

If your home was built in the last 35 years, chances are it has two 20-amp circuits running to your kitchen countertop outlets. Newer homes will have three circuits. If you're constantly tripping the breaker to your kitchen, it's most likely because you have too many electrical devices connected to the same circuit. To help alleviate this problem, place appliances like coffee makers and toasters on two different circuits. That way, they can share the load.

At the end of the day, your home is your place of solitude and relaxation. But, when you have electrical issues in your home, things can quickly go from peaceful to problematic. Whether you're renovating your home and need a new room wired for power or your panel breaker keeps giving your problems, L&M Electric is here to assist. If you have questions about an issue or need to schedule service, our team is ready to help answer your questions and coordinate the best time for a residential electrician to come to your home in Ariel.

 Smart Home Electrician Ariel, SC

Tips to Save Money and Maintain Your Home's Electrical Systems

Unlike some of our competitors, who are reluctant to provide any information that might prevent them from making a buck, L&M Electric is all about empowering our customers. If we can offer sound advice that will educate our clients and help them save money, we have no problem doing so. That's why we have put together some helpful tips and tricks for maintaining your home's most common electrical systems. Because, at the end of the day, a little knowledge can go a long way when it comes to your family's safety.

 Smart Home Installation Ariel, SC

Install Surge Protectors

Intense lighting storms can cause powerful surges of electricity that ruin your home's electrical appliances and amenities. Surge protectors installed at your electrical panel can help prevent these surges by grounding the electricity running through your home. They do so by directing it away from your electrical devices. This common solution is inexpensive, effective, and always a better choice than replacing expensive items like TVs and computers.

 Electrical Repairs Ariel, SC

Examine Your Breaker Panel

Breaker panels control the power to your home. When they go bad or are damaged, there's a good chance that you will lose power to most of the rooms in your house. Open your breaker panel and keep a sharp eye out for signs of corrosion and rust. Double-check that each breaker you see flips on and off properly. If you notice corrosion or if the breaker switches won't flip, it's time to get in touch with a residential electrician in Ariel, SC, who can inspect your breaker panel and recommend upgrades if necessary.

 Electrical Safety Inspection Company Ariel, SC

Test Your GFIs

GFIs, or Ground Fault Interrupters, are similar to surge protectors in that they prevent electrical damage from happening in your home. The primary job of a GFI is to prevent electrical shocks that happen during a ground fault. Because water is a conductor of electricity, GFIs should be installed anywhere that an outlet comes into contact with water. You should try to test your GFIs every month, if possible, to ensure that they are working correctly. When you look closely at your GFI, you will notice a "test" and a "reset" button. Hit the "test" button to trip the GFI outlet and then hit "reset" to restore power. If your outlet resets, your GFI is working as it should. If not, you need to replace your GFI outlet. Because electricity is involved, we recommend hiring a professional to install new GFIs in your home. That way, you know the job is done right.

 Whole Home Electrical Install Ariel, SC

Replace Outdated Light Bulbs

The right light bulb can add the perfect amount of ambiance to your home. Eventually, however, even the best light bulbs will need replacing. While they don't need checking every month, it's a good idea to inspect all your bulbs at the beginning of the year. If any of your bulbs are dead, you should replace them. You should also consider replacing bulbs that are incandescent with LED lights. LED light bulbs may cost more upfront but use less electricity and are more efficient over the long run.

Electrical Services Ariel, SC

Schedule a Home Safety Inspection

In terms of preventative maintenance, scheduling a safety inspection for your home's electrical systems should be a high priority. These inspections will shine a light on the electrical features in your home that need to be fixed. Most modern electrical fires are caused by short circuit arcs, defective insulation, or broken wiring. An inspection conducted by a qualified electrician will help determine what needs to be fixed so you and your family stay safe in your home. Your inspector should cover your whole home and will examine common features such as:

  • Breakers
  • Fans
  • Exposed Wiring
  • Electrical Panels
  • Circuits
  • Switches
  • Outlets and More
 Remodel And Renovation Electrical Work Ariel, SC

DELIVERING QUALITY ELECTRICAL SERVICE TO 5,000+ HOMES PER YEAR

he electrical system in your home brings it to life from the lights and appliances we use every day to the entertainment we all love and enjoy. You want an electrician that makes you feel safe while delivering the quality services you're promised.

ELECTRICIAN SERVICE REQUEST

Full-Service Electrical Work for Home and Business

Whether you need light switch services for your newly renovated home or need a generator installed at your commercial property, L&M Electric is here to serve you. Our team will get the job done right, so you can get back to loving your life in the Lowcountry.

Coantact Us
 Electrician Ariel, SC

Latest News in Ariel, SC

‘You went too far:’ Husband of Food Network star pleads guilty in 3-year-old’s death

GREENVILLE, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - On Thursday Jerry “Austin” Robinson, the husband of Food Network star Ariel Robinson, pleaded guilty in connection with the death of Victoria Smith, the couple’s 3-year-old foster daughter.“Tori” died after she was beaten by Ariel Robinson at their home on Sellwood Circle in Simpsonville on Jan. 14, 2021, according to prosecutors.New details about the investigation into Tori’s death came out during Thursday’s hearing.Jerry Robinson pleaded guilty...

GREENVILLE, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - On Thursday Jerry “Austin” Robinson, the husband of Food Network star Ariel Robinson, pleaded guilty in connection with the death of Victoria Smith, the couple’s 3-year-old foster daughter.

“Tori” died after she was beaten by Ariel Robinson at their home on Sellwood Circle in Simpsonville on Jan. 14, 2021, according to prosecutors.

New details about the investigation into Tori’s death came out during Thursday’s hearing.

Jerry Robinson pleaded guilty to homicide by child abuse/aiding and abetting homicide by child abuse. He will remain on house arrest until Ariel Robinson’s trial.

Prosecutors said Jerry Robinson claims he never physically hurt Tori but told investigators Ariel would beat her with different things including a belt.

Ariel was angry with Tori the night before her death because she threw up on herself on the way to church, Jerry Robinson told investigators. The next morning, he said Ariel was frustrated with Tori for not eating her pancakes fast enough.

He described hearing Ariel giving Tori a “whooping” with a belt that was audible from outside the home. According to prosecutors, when Jerry went inside he saw Ariel standing over Tori with the belt saying, “You don’t get to tell me when you’re done.”

Robinson reportedly told Ariel, “You’ve gone too far. You went too far this time.” He went to CVS to buy liquid Tylenol to try to bring the bruising down, attorneys said, and they gave Tori an Epsom salt bath.

Jerry called 911 hours later and when first responders arrived at the home, Tori was in cardiac arrest.

Jerry Robinson’s attorney asked the judge to take his cooperation with the investigation into account when considering sentencing. He faces 10 to 20 years minimum in prison. He will be sentenced after Ariel Robinson’s trial.

Ariel Robinson will go to trial on May 9.

The Robinsons’ attorney asked for court proceedings before Ariel’s trial to be closed to media and the public, but a judge denied the request. The judge said efforts are being taken to ensure Ariel Robinson has a fair trial and they have notified three times the normal number of jurors.

Prosecutors asked for body camera footage from when first responders responded to the 911 call on Sellwood Circle to be admissible in court during Ariel Robinson’s trial.

The body camera footage captures first responders’ “horrified” reactions when they found the bruising on Victoria’s body, according to prosecutors.

Prosecutors said Ariel Robinson told first responders the bruising on her abdomen was caused by the force she used trying to do CPR. She claimed the bruising on Victoria’s legs was caused by her then-7-year-old brother, according to prosecutors.

Robinson’s attorney has pushed for the body camera footage to be inadmissible, however, since she was not read her Miranda Rights on scene at the time.

The judge will decide Friday whether or not the body camera footage is admissible.

Prosecutors also asked for seven photographs to be admissible in court. Six of the photos show Tori’s injuries and one autopsy photo shows the internal bleeding that caused her death. She bled to death internally in her legs, prosecutors said.

In pushing for the photos of Tori’s injuries to be admissible in court, prosecutors say they show the amount of force that caused her death - which they argue could not be caused by another child.

They said Ariel Robinson committed abuse that shows “an extreme indifference to human life.”

The Robinsons’ attorney argued that the graphic photographs are not needed for a jury to understand the case. A judge ruled five of the seven photos are admissible in court.

Robinson was a winner of season 20 of Food Network’s Worst Cooks in America.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Bond hearing reveals what ‘Worst Cooks in America’ winner claimed led to 3-year-old foster child’s death

Copyright 2022 WHNS. All rights reserved.

‘The Little Mermaid’ swims onto stage

Take a trip “Under the Sea” when the Community Playhouse of Lancaster County performs the first play of its 50th anniversary season, Disney’s “The Little Mermaid,” opening Wednesday, July 27.The summer show is always a youth production, so the cast includes actors ages 8 to 22, with college students Jessica Dutton as Ariel, Sunni Greene as Ursula and Matt White as Sebastian. High school senior Andrew Scribner plays Prince Eric.“I’m super excited,” said Rock Hill High drama teacher...

Take a trip “Under the Sea” when the Community Playhouse of Lancaster County performs the first play of its 50th anniversary season, Disney’s “The Little Mermaid,” opening Wednesday, July 27.

The summer show is always a youth production, so the cast includes actors ages 8 to 22, with college students Jessica Dutton as Ariel, Sunni Greene as Ursula and Matt White as Sebastian. High school senior Andrew Scribner plays Prince Eric.

“I’m super excited,” said Rock Hill High drama teacher Stephanie Daniels, who is directing her seventh Playhouse summer production. “One of the coolest things about (doing) the shows over multiple years, especially if you work with kids, is that you see the kids grow up.”

The play, with music by Alan Menken, brings to life the Hans Christian Anderson story of a mermaid, Ariel, who falls in love with a human, Prince Eric. But to live on land with him, Ariel must sell her voice to Ursula, an evil sea witch.

Will she and Eric find love despite the circumstances?

Along the Way Ariel relies on her animal friends, Flounder the fish, Scuttle the seagull and Sebastian the crab.

The play is a favorite for some of the actors.

Starring in the play was “a dream come true,” for Dutton, a vocal performance senior at Coker College.

“When I got the text saying that I got Ariel, I was in my car,” Dutton said. “And I sat there and I cried. I was crying my eyes out because I feel like I prepared for this role my entire life. Like since I’ve been a kid, like I was dreaming of it. I was so excited.

“Just the role itself — it’s been my dream role ever since I started theater. It was the reason that I started theater. I feel like my life is complete now.”

Dutton is very grateful and honored to be able to play the role.

“I love working with Stephanie as a director because she’s just very personable and friendly and I understand everything she’s asking me to do. She’s always pushing us. Her passion is for theater, like you can tell she is so, so into it, which makes it easier for us as actors to get on stage and be able to portray the character.”

This play has stretched the actors’ abilities as they have had to sing, dance and act throughout the whole play.

“I feel like this play has made me a better actor,” said Greene, a USC theater sophomore, “because it’s given me the opportunity to play a character that’s very different than anything I’ve ever played before. This is the first time I’ve ever played a villain, and it’s also the first big role in a musical that I’ve ever had. Ursula is a very confident character and I feel like playing her has given me a lot of confidence in my own abilities as an actor.”

To get into his character, USC sophomore Matt White said he “watched the movie multiple times, and I listened to a lot of reggae music.”

“It’s very different,” White said. “I feel like I‘ve played a lot of characters that are like me, like they have some sort of trait that’s like strong, like I already kinda have that, but I feel like with Sebastian, it’s just such a musical role and I haven’t really done that in awhile, so it’s really challenged me, but in a fun way.”

The students rehearsed four or five days a week for about six weeks.

Helping Daniels with the play are Lancaster High School drama teacher Troy Dunbar as musical director, Amanda Ghent as choreographer and Playhouse President Catherine Wallace as stage manager.

“For any young person, whether it’s the 8-year-old all the way up to the college students, to give up their summertime, their free time, to work so hard on something like this, takes a lot and I’m very proud of them for being willing to do that,” Wallace said.

She said she’s noticed that if the kids aren’t in a scene being rehearsed, they’re out in the hall practicing their choreography or their song, rather than just sitting around doing nothing, which takes a lot of maturity.

“I’m very proud of them for that, for their passion and determination to make a good show.”

Daniels says the show is good for the whole family.

“You can bring Grandma, you can bring the kids, and you know most people know the musical or they know the movie “The Little Mermaid,’ ” she said. “So I want them to come and have fun, and I want them to enjoy the songs.”

The musical classic will be staged at 7:30 p.m. July 27-30 and 3 p.m. July 30-31 in the Indian Land High School auditorium, 6100 Charlotte Highway, Lancaster.

Tickets are available online at www.lancasterplayhouse.com for $6 kids 5 and under, $11 for students and seniors, and adults are $16. Tickets will also be available at the door.

Epigenetic patterns in a complete human genome

Structured AbstractThe human reference genome has served as the foundation for many large-scale initiatives, including the collective effort to catalog the epigenome, the set of marks and protein interactions that act to control gene activity and cellular function. However, for more than two decades, efforts to construct a complete epigenome have been hampered by an incomplete reference genome. With recent technological advances, we can now study genome structure and function comprehensively across a complete telomere-to-telomere hu...

Structured Abstract

The human reference genome has served as the foundation for many large-scale initiatives, including the collective effort to catalog the epigenome, the set of marks and protein interactions that act to control gene activity and cellular function. However, for more than two decades, efforts to construct a complete epigenome have been hampered by an incomplete reference genome. With recent technological advances, we can now study genome structure and function comprehensively across a complete telomere-to-telomere human genome assembly, T2T-CHM13. As a result, we can now broaden the human epigenome to include 225 million base pairs (Mbp) of additional sequence.

The epigenome refers to DNA modifications (e.g., CpG methylation), protein-DNA interactions, histone modifications, and chromatin organization that collectively influence gene expression, genome regulation, and genome stability. These epigenetic features are heritable upon cell division but dynamic during development, generating profiles that are unique to different tissues and cell types. Here, we present an epigenetic annotation of the human genome in which we explore previously unresolved regions, including acrocentric chromosome short arms, segmentally duplicated genes, and a diverse collection of repeat classes, including human centromeres. Generating a complete epigenetic annotation of the previously missing 8% of the human genome provides a foundation for elucidating the functional roles of these genomic elements that are critical to our understanding of genome regulation, function, and evolution.

Completion of the human epigenome required that we develop approaches to profiling the previously unresolved regions. Using the T2T-CHM13 reference with existing short-read epigenetic data, we identified 3 to 19% more enrichment sites for epigenetic markers. However, even with the complete reference, these short-read epigenetic methods cannot correctly resolve regions of the genome of high similarity, including segmental duplications, gene paralogs, or large repeat arrays. On the other hand, long-read epigenetic methods can resolve single-molecule epigenetic patterns within these regions by anchoring to flanking or infrequent unique regions, providing a foundational assessment of these areas. Long-read methylation calls using the T2T-CHM13 assembly increased the number of probeable CpG sites by 10% (3.2 M), revealing epigenetic patterning of genomic regions that were previously intractable. We generated long-read methylomes of distinct developmental time points and surveyed >99% of the genome’s CpGs. We probed highly homologous gene families and observed paralog-specific differences in regulation between disease and nondisease states. In tandem repeats, we identified differences in epigenetic regulation between genetically identical sequences present across different genomic locations, observing locus- and single-molecule-level differences in methylation. Our analysis revealed that these regions vary in epigenetic and transcriptional activity despite high sequence identity, highlighting the importance of the local chromosome environment as a modulator of epigenetics. Finally, the T2T-CHM13 genome assembly has opened exploration of the human centromere, enabling us to probe the epigenetic elements that define centromeric chromatin. The centromere is the site of assembly of the kinetochore complex, an essential complex for eukaryotic cell division. We generated complete epigenetic maps of human centromeres, revealing epigenetic markers of centromere activity that denote active human kinetochores. We predicted kinetochore site localization within active centromeres and report variability of kinetochore localization across individuals representing diverse ancestry.

The improvements in epigenetic profiling using T2T-CHM13 set the foundation for complete assemblies and long-read epigenetics for major biological advancements. Using technological advances in genome resequencing and alignment, we present a comprehensive functional assessment of previously unresolved genomic regions. This study marks the start of exploration into duplicated and repetitive portions of the epigenome, pioneering the exploration of epigenetics in a complete human genome.

Abstract

The completion of a telomere-to-telomere human reference genome, T2T-CHM13, has resolved complex regions of the genome, including repetitive and homologous regions. Here, we present a high-resolution epigenetic study of previously unresolved sequences, representing entire acrocentric chromosome short arms, gene family expansions, and a diverse collection of repeat classes. This resource precisely maps CpG methylation (32.28 million CpGs), DNA accessibility, and short-read datasets (166,058 previously unresolved chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing peaks) to provide evidence of activity across previously unidentified or corrected genes and reveals clinically relevant paralog-specific regulation. Probing CpG methylation across human centromeres from six diverse individuals generated an estimate of variability in kinetochore localization. This analysis provides a framework with which to investigate the most elusive regions of the human genome, granting insights into epigenetic regulation.

Impartirá artista Miguel Terreros talleres sobre enseñanza y elaboración de alebrijes: SC

Tras su partición en el 14º Desfile de Alebrijes Monumentales 2022, celebrado el pasado 22 de octubre en Ciudad de México, el artista plástico Miguel Terreros Martínez a iniciar un circuito de talleres para la enseñanza y elaboración de esos animales fantásticos, informó el titular de la Secretar&...

Tras su partición en el 14º Desfile de Alebrijes Monumentales 2022, celebrado el pasado 22 de octubre en Ciudad de México, el artista plástico Miguel Terreros Martínez a iniciar un circuito de talleres para la enseñanza y elaboración de esos animales fantásticos, informó el titular de la Secretaría de Cultura (SC) del estado, Antonio Martínez Velázquez.

Asimismo, dio a conocer que acordó con Miguel Terreros que el alebrije “Halcactoli” de 2.40 metros de altura y 3.60 de ancho y con peso de 60 kilos se exponga en uno de los espacios del Centro de las Artes de Tlaxcala (Cedart), ubicado en el municipio de Apizaco, mientras el artista concreta su participación en un evento en Brasil en próximas fechas.

Lo anterior como parte del reconocimiento que hace el gobierno de Lorena Cuéllar Cisneros al creador originario de la comunidad de Francisco I. Madero del municipio de Nanacamilpa, por haber representado a la entidad en desfile celebrado en Ciudad de México, por lo que también se le hizo entrega de un apoyo de 10 mil pesos, explicó el funcionario.

El acto, abundó, forma parte de una nueva política implementada por la gobernadora Lorena Cuéllar Cisneros de valorar en toda su magnitud el trabajo que realiza artistas tlaxcaltecas, como ya lo hizo hace unos días con el actor Raúl Briones por haber ganado el Ariel como mejor actor en el filme “Una película de policías” este año.

“Para nosotros es muy importante que todo aquello que había estado excluido o marginado hoy está en el centro de la agenda cultural y que los artistas de las comunidades sean reconocidos”, expuso el funcionario durante el protocolo celebrado en instalaciones de la Coordinación de Comunicación del gobierno del estado.

El titular de la Secretaría de Cultura resaltó la importancia de que las nuevas generaciones tlaxcaltecas aprendan el arte y la técnica de elaboración de alebrijes, para que a su vez, la repliquen. Asimismo, comprometió el apoyo del gobierno del estado “para que el viaje a Brasil sea una realidad y no solo una esperanza”.

“Halcactoli”, palabra compuesta de Hal-Halcón, Cac-Cacomixtle y Toli-Toro de lida fue hecho de cartón, papel y armazón de alambrón y tuvo un costo de elaboración de alrededor de 65 mil pesos entre materiales y gastos de operación, informó por su parte el artista Miguel Terreros.

Segmental duplications and their variation in a complete human genome

Structured AbstractLarge, high-identity duplicated sequences—termed segmental duplications (SDs)—are frequently the last regions of genomes to be sequenced and assembled. While the human reference genome provided a roadmap of the SD landscape, >50% of the remaining gaps correspond to regions of complex SDs.SDs are major sources of evolutionary gene innovations and contribute disproportionately to genetic variation within and between ape species. With the complete human genome (T2T-CHM13), researchers have the p...

Structured Abstract

Large, high-identity duplicated sequences—termed segmental duplications (SDs)—are frequently the last regions of genomes to be sequenced and assembled. While the human reference genome provided a roadmap of the SD landscape, >50% of the remaining gaps correspond to regions of complex SDs.

SDs are major sources of evolutionary gene innovations and contribute disproportionately to genetic variation within and between ape species. With the complete human genome (T2T-CHM13), researchers have the potential to identify genes and uncover patterns of human genetic variation.

We identified 51 million base pairs (Mbp) of additional human SD in T2T-CHM13 and now estimate that 7% of the human genome consists of SDs [(218 Mbp of 3.1 billion base pairs (Gbp)]. SDs make up two-thirds (45.1 of 68.1 Mbp) of acrocentric short arms, and these SDs are the largest in the human genome (see the figure, panel A). Additionally, 54% of acrocentric SDs are copy number variable or map to different chromosomes among the six individuals examined. A detailed comparison between the current reference genome (GRCh38) and T2T-CHM13 for SD content identifies 81 Mbp of previously unresolved or structurally variable SDs. Short-read whole-genome sequence data from a diversity panel of 268 humans show that human copy number is nine times (59.26 versus 6.55 Mbp) more likely to match T2T-CHM13 rather than GRCh38, including 119 protein-coding genes (see the figure, panel B). Using long-read–sequencing data from 25 human haplotypes, we investigated patterns of human genetic variation identifying significant increases in structural and single-nucleotide diversity. We identified gene-rich regions (e.g., TBC1D3) that vary by hundreds of kilo–base pairs and gene copy number between individuals showing some of the highest genome-wide structural heterozygosity (85 to 90%). Our analysis identified 182 candidate protein-coding genes as well as the complete sequence for structurally variable gene models that were previously unresolved. Among these is the complete gene structure of lipoprotein A (LPA), including the expanded kringle IV repeat domain. Reduced copies of this domain are among the strongest genetic associations with cardiovascular disease, especially among African Americans, and sequencing of multiple human haplotypes identified not only copy number variation but also other forms of rare coding variation potentially relevant to disease risk. Finally, we compared global methylation and expression patterns between duplicated and unique genes. Transcriptionally inactive duplicate genes are more likely to map to hypomethylated genomic regions; however, specifically over the transcription start site we observe an increase in methylation, suggesting that as many as two-thirds of duplicated genes are epigenetically silenced. Additionally, SD genes show a high degree of concordance between methylation profiles and transcription levels, allowing us to define the actively transcribed members of high-identity gene families that are otherwise indistinguishable by coding sequence.

A complete human genome provides a more comprehensive understanding of the organization, expression, and regulation of duplicated genes. Our analysis reveals underappreciated patterns of human genetic diversity and suggests characteristic features of methylation and gene regulation. This resource will serve as a critical baseline for improved gene annotation, genotyping, and previously unknown associations for some of the most dynamic regions of our genome.

Abstract

Despite their importance in disease and evolution, highly identical segmental duplications (SDs) are among the last regions of the human reference genome (GRCh38) to be fully sequenced. Using a complete telomere-to-telomere human genome (T2T-CHM13), we present a comprehensive view of human SD organization. SDs account for nearly one-third of the additional sequence, increasing the genome-wide estimate from 5.4 to 7.0% [218 million base pairs (Mbp)]. An analysis of 268 human genomes shows that 91% of the previously unresolved T2T-CHM13 SD sequence (68.3 Mbp) better represents human copy number variation. Comparing long-read assemblies from human (n = 12) and nonhuman primate (n = 5) genomes, we systematically reconstruct the evolution and structural haplotype diversity of biomedically relevant and duplicated genes. This analysis reveals patterns of structural heterozygosity and evolutionary differences in SD organization between humans and other primates.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.